Weekly Photography Challenge: Curve

This week it’s curves we need to portray to rise to the challenge. There are curves all around us, every day. Our own bodies are full of curves, and although most architecture employs straight lines, the objects we put inside our building are frequently curved. Curves are pleasing, suggesting softness and a more relaxed outlook on life.

In order to photograph some curves, I didn’t even need to leave the room – but I added a photo I took at my mother’s house a few weeks ago.

Bowls and balls of yarn just seem to go together – in my house, anyway. The painting was just playing around with Peerless watercolours – but then curvy tea vessels appeared out of the background. There’s a very curvy vase on my mantelpiece, alongside several other curvy objects –  the glass bird in particular. I will never acheive a minimalist mantel – partly because having the space occupied keeps the cat off – but also because I enjoy collecting and juxtaposing groups of things too much!

Creativity: On the Mat

I’m a regular volunteer at Ararat Regional Art Gallery, and one of my tasks is to help out with children’s workshops. A Mini-Maker’s Art Club started recently as a monthly story-and-craft session for preschoolers. I thought story time needed a suitably magical carpet for the littlies to sit on, and so I began to crochet one. It has grown a little bigger with each session, and all being well, I aim to have finished it by the July one.

I was inspired by the work of Alexandra Kehayoglou , but I don’t have the carpet loom or skills to copy her work. I do have free-form crochet skills and a stash of yarn that needs busting, so that’s how my “Moss carpet” has been growing.

One of our mums commented that it needed a pool, so I did one in blues with silver sparkles. Last night I made an arigurumi pebble to fill up a little round hole, and I will be making some more – can’t imagine why I didn’t think of it earlier!

The idea is to have a soft and tactile place to sit during story time – we have a supply of cushions as well – and to include little lumps and bump and many different textures so that it is always interesting. Ararat Regional Art Gallery has an international reputation with our permanent collection of textiles, so my story time mat complements that, too.

At present we are hosting a wonderful exhibition from NGV of Central Asian textiles and jewellery – a must-see for lovers of embroidery and textiles generally.

The creativity of the children’s clothing in particular is incredible – so many hours and loving stitches, amulets and protective symbols put in by mothers to clothe and keep their precious children safe. Have at look at the Gallery’s Facebook page (and like it while you’re there!) for a taste of what’s on show.

 

Weekly Photography Challenge: Spare

My first thought from the prompt “Spare” was sparseness, but I couldn’t think of any subject that would convey that and be interesting. I don’t have a desert nearby…so I’m going with spare in the sense of extra, additional, excess even. A few years ago, a determined gang of needle-crafters yarn-bombed trees and railings outside the Ararat Regional Art Gallery,in time for the 45th anniversary of the institution.

Anyone who knits and/or crochets (and even people who just think about doing it!) end up with a stash of spare yarn. Some of it is leftover from finished projects and some is odd balls that we buy because…well, there’s bound to be some reason. A yarn-bombing project, fortunately for our cupboards, requires lots of yarn in no particular colour, ply or texture. Nor does it matter if it’s wool, nylon, cotton or whatever else. It just has to be yarn….

Here are six pics of the lead-up and yarnbombing at the Ararat Regional Art Gallery, plus two spare ones of a yarnbombing at King’s park in Perth, September 2013, ( I think.)

Weekly Photography Challenge; Culture

This weeks challenge is culture, which can mean many things. That’s half the fun. I confess that my first thought was of a petrie dish full of bacteria…and
I haven’t been to India, or any other colourful exotic culture, so what else? I thought of music, festivals – plenty of colour and movement there – .Mondo Cane  and then I thought, Yarnbombing! That’s become a culture all of it’s own.
Melbourne city square

From humble beginnings in Texas (so the story goes) yarnbombing has spread around the globe.Yarnbomb, Sydney Rd 2

This one is the work of a church social group in Brunswick. The first one was in Melbourne’s City Square, and had government sponsorship.Tag

Old style graffiti is less welcome, sadly, although it brightens dull corners equally well.railside graff

It’s a lot harder to remove, so I guess that’s got a lot to do with it’s unpopularity with some sectors of the community.
Melbourne’s street art culture is becoming more acceptable, though, because it’s becoming known as a tourist attraction  =$$$$my first yarnbombMy own first excursion in yarnbomb culture was this tiny granny square on the fence of the local sport’s ground ( home of a whole other culture!) It vanished the weekend of a music festival…(more culture.)

just yarn

Ararat’s Regional Art Gallery is justly famous for it’s focus on textile and fibre art. preperationWhat better way to celebrate it than a yarnbomb?Our first post

Ever since I said “Let’s yarnbomb the gallery” to our Director, and he said “Good idea. You organise it”(or words to that effect), I and Deb and a few others have been working away at knitting and crocheting pieces  with which to embellish the surroundings of the building.chaos comes first

The Gallery is 45 this May, so to celebrate that cultural achievement, our yarnbomb will be installed on May 13.pieces

It won’t be our last foray into the culture of yarnbombing!

 http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/photo-challenge-culture/