Weekly Photography Challenge: Underneath the Bridge

When I read this week’s challenge theme (a week that is nearly over…) there was only one bridge  I was thinking of. I did take some photos while crossing a bridge over the Murray recently – only there was no card in the camera…we’ll have to go that way again sometime, and try again.

We have plans to visit Aberdeen, Washington again someday, and if we do, we will certainly visit the famous bridge again. It must have been a great private spot forty years ago, now not so much…it’s a place of pilgrimage instead. Someone had carved “KURT” in giant letters on the mud of the bank, and every accessible surface was embellished with graffiti –  messages to Kurt, and quotes of Nirvana lyrics, mostly. All that will have changed by now.

Bryan insisted on taking a photo of me standing under it. I’m the photographer in our family, which means I don’t get in many photos. This was August 2011, and about halfway through our month in the Pacific North West.

Creativity: Party Prop II

IMG_7270 (Large)

I’ve been working some more on my photo background “party prop”. I’ve added extra width with a spare panel from a folding screen. I bought a couple of chunky markers, and have been adding bits as I think of it. It’s under the clothes line, so I’m often “just passing”! and getting sidetracked…IMG_7274 (Large)

I had to add this old Nirvana poster (a copy, I hasten to add) because it was on my birthday 25 years ago.

Hunting for a different stencil (which I didn’t find) I came across this one I did of a very dapper William Burroughs.

Here’s a gallery showing the evolving layers. I drew a line (wire) for the Typo bird stencil. Bird on the Wire is a favourite Leonard Cohen song of mine. There’s an  Emma Magenta rub-on decal, more typo stencils, a print of a graffiti stencil from Aberdeen Washington. I’ve also sloshed on some old, thick paint, mainly on the top edge, for some artful drips. I’m finding it a bit challenging to cover up my earlier efforts, even though that’s the whole idea…but I’m getting there!

This is a project that could go on for a very long time, but the party is now just over a month off, so that gives me an end date!

 

Weekly Photography Challenge: Grid

For something different – this week’s Photography Challenge is to place a grid upfront in photos, rather than using an imaginary one to help compose a pleasing picture. I had a couple I’ve taken recently at home.

One is the ‘roof’ of our new shadehouse (aka “The Umbratorium”), and the other a gridded frame I’m using as a moodboard as I daydream about repainting our lounge.

I’m in Canberra for a few weeks, and took the camera out and about on the weekend – mainly to take pictures of Juniper, who is now two years old – but I found some grid patterns, as well.

We went to Weston Park to a miniature railway – lots of grids there! Juniper had two rides then cried all the way home, because she didn’t want to leave “Thomas…!” I found the drainage hole grid at one of the markets we went to, and the graffiti wall and gridded window where we parked our car to visit the famous Bus Depot Market. Juniper has decorated the screen door on to the balcony of her home – which gives the chalk an interesting texture.IMG_6106 (Large)

And finally, here is miss Juniper herself, enjoying a slice of rainbow birthday cake, with the grid of floor tiles as background.

Daily Prompt: Karma Chameleon

Today’s prompt asks writers to talk about Karma – if you knew it was a real phenomenon, how would it affect your behaviour –  but for artists, poets and photographers, the prompt is much simpler – Circles.

Circles may come in many forms, such as the giant basket-work structure, or the moon,  but they are all, by definition, capable of revolution.

Weekly Photography Challenge; Culture

This weeks challenge is culture, which can mean many things. That’s half the fun. I confess that my first thought was of a petrie dish full of bacteria…and
I haven’t been to India, or any other colourful exotic culture, so what else? I thought of music, festivals – plenty of colour and movement there – .Mondo Cane  and then I thought, Yarnbombing! That’s become a culture all of it’s own.
Melbourne city square

From humble beginnings in Texas (so the story goes) yarnbombing has spread around the globe.Yarnbomb, Sydney Rd 2

This one is the work of a church social group in Brunswick. The first one was in Melbourne’s City Square, and had government sponsorship.Tag

Old style graffiti is less welcome, sadly, although it brightens dull corners equally well.railside graff

It’s a lot harder to remove, so I guess that’s got a lot to do with it’s unpopularity with some sectors of the community.
Melbourne’s street art culture is becoming more acceptable, though, because it’s becoming known as a tourist attraction  =$$$$my first yarnbombMy own first excursion in yarnbomb culture was this tiny granny square on the fence of the local sport’s ground ( home of a whole other culture!) It vanished the weekend of a music festival…(more culture.)

just yarn

Ararat’s Regional Art Gallery is justly famous for it’s focus on textile and fibre art. preperationWhat better way to celebrate it than a yarnbomb?Our first post

Ever since I said “Let’s yarnbomb the gallery” to our Director, and he said “Good idea. You organise it”(or words to that effect), I and Deb and a few others have been working away at knitting and crocheting pieces  with which to embellish the surroundings of the building.chaos comes first

The Gallery is 45 this May, so to celebrate that cultural achievement, our yarnbomb will be installed on May 13.pieces

It won’t be our last foray into the culture of yarnbombing!

 http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/photo-challenge-culture/

thinking about creative thinkers

 

Creative thinkers tend to be malcontents who see beyond the myths of popular beliefs and common practice. This is in part why idleness – a precondition for reflective or critical thinking, and for deep contemplation – is not encouraged: idleness creates the conditions in which social norms can be challenged.

As a result, the status quo has imposed the unspoken dictum, ‘To work, and therefore not to think too much!’

In a system in which we live to work rather than work to live, there is little time to become an informed global citizen – an active participant who develops new views that liberate the community into expanding it’s outlook and seeing beyond set assumptions and limiting boundaries. In a community that is challenged by freely expressed creativity, creativity is pushed to the margins, corralled outside the safety and security of established norms. But creativity at the extremes of any whole – whether the margins of society, the tips of a tree branch in springtime, the edges of ignorance or at the far reaches of everything in the universe – creates new possibilities that transform reality.

Creativity is a force for change that transforms by forging new relationships, connecting the parts at their extremities, and originating a new and healthy whole.  

As Albert Einstein said “Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.”

And because it was Guy Fawkes Night yesterday –

Bonfire Haiku

The moon had risen;

So had the wind.

I put out the fire.

I am aware that I have not adhered to the haiku rules here, but that’s O.K. Poetry can always use a little anarchy.