Weekly Photography Challenge; Culture

This weeks challenge is culture, which can mean many things. That’s half the fun. I confess that my first thought was of a petrie dish full of bacteria…and
I haven’t been to India, or any other colourful exotic culture, so what else? I thought of music, festivals – plenty of colour and movement there – .Mondo Cane  and then I thought, Yarnbombing! That’s become a culture all of it’s own.
Melbourne city square

From humble beginnings in Texas (so the story goes) yarnbombing has spread around the globe.Yarnbomb, Sydney Rd 2

This one is the work of a church social group in Brunswick. The first one was in Melbourne’s City Square, and had government sponsorship.Tag

Old style graffiti is less welcome, sadly, although it brightens dull corners equally well.railside graff

It’s a lot harder to remove, so I guess that’s got a lot to do with it’s unpopularity with some sectors of the community.
Melbourne’s street art culture is becoming more acceptable, though, because it’s becoming known as a tourist attraction  =$$$$my first yarnbombMy own first excursion in yarnbomb culture was this tiny granny square on the fence of the local sport’s ground ( home of a whole other culture!) It vanished the weekend of a music festival…(more culture.)

just yarn

Ararat’s Regional Art Gallery is justly famous for it’s focus on textile and fibre art. preperationWhat better way to celebrate it than a yarnbomb?Our first post

Ever since I said “Let’s yarnbomb the gallery” to our Director, and he said “Good idea. You organise it”(or words to that effect), I and Deb and a few others have been working away at knitting and crocheting pieces  with which to embellish the surroundings of the building.chaos comes first

The Gallery is 45 this May, so to celebrate that cultural achievement, our yarnbomb will be installed on May 13.pieces

It won’t be our last foray into the culture of yarnbombing!

 http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/photo-challenge-culture/

thinking about creative thinkers

 

Creative thinkers tend to be malcontents who see beyond the myths of popular beliefs and common practice. This is in part why idleness – a precondition for reflective or critical thinking, and for deep contemplation – is not encouraged: idleness creates the conditions in which social norms can be challenged.

As a result, the status quo has imposed the unspoken dictum, ‘To work, and therefore not to think too much!’

In a system in which we live to work rather than work to live, there is little time to become an informed global citizen – an active participant who develops new views that liberate the community into expanding it’s outlook and seeing beyond set assumptions and limiting boundaries. In a community that is challenged by freely expressed creativity, creativity is pushed to the margins, corralled outside the safety and security of established norms. But creativity at the extremes of any whole – whether the margins of society, the tips of a tree branch in springtime, the edges of ignorance or at the far reaches of everything in the universe – creates new possibilities that transform reality.

Creativity is a force for change that transforms by forging new relationships, connecting the parts at their extremities, and originating a new and healthy whole.  

As Albert Einstein said “Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.”

And because it was Guy Fawkes Night yesterday –

Bonfire Haiku

The moon had risen;

So had the wind.

I put out the fire.

I am aware that I have not adhered to the haiku rules here, but that’s O.K. Poetry can always use a little anarchy.