Mt Hood Daffodils – and Mt Hood

I planted a White Garden over thirty years ago, inspired by the famous one at Sissinghurst castle in England. Over the years, the “White” has become less disciplined, but the Mt Hood daffodils have survived, multiplied and continue to bloom.

In August 2011, we spent a few days in Portland, Oregon, enjoying the views of the actual Mount Hood. When we got home again in early September, my ghostly white daffodils had excelled themselves, and were the first thing I saw as we pulled in to our driveway.

They have flowered well again this year. The trumpet is a soft lemon when they first open, but over a week or two, they fade to snowy white – just like their namesake.

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Silverband Falls walk

On a sunny Sunday afternoon in winter, we went to Hall’s Gap and, for a change, took the walk to Silverband Falls instead of our usual Venus Baths. The actual walk is roughly the same distance, but we had to drive south of Hall’s gap to reach it. There are not many flowers in July, but plenty of mosses, lichens and fungi. We spotted a dead tree that looks like a funny/monster face, which was definitely a bonus!

Weekly Photography Challenge: Unlikely

Portray something unlikely

Morgan’s Lookout is an unlikely place, a pile of granite tors on top of a hill. It is named after the bushranger who camped out there in the nineteenth century, looking out for travellers to rob.

It commands a marvellous view of the country-side in all directions, especially if you brave the climb to the top of the rocks. I only went part way, up that near-vertical metal ladder…

 

We have driven past Morgan’s Lookout a couple of times before, but last month, despite being short of time, we turned of the main road and drove through paddocks to reach the  hill. There is a picnic table, and a toilet block (presumably drop toilets, I didn’t look!). Alex and I scrambled up between the rocks, and he went all the way to the top. There was a massive deposit of tickle-grass lodged between some of the rocks, and even from halfway, the view out across the plains is impressive. I’m grateful to whoever decided to make the place available to the public, as it is the middle of farmlandIMG_20180417_104807s.

Weekly Photography Challenge: Lines

The week is almost over, but here are my lines…

Straight lines in bricks and graph paper, curvy lines in some sort of succulent – growing in the incredible Cactus Country at Strathmerton in Victoria, Australia. If you are ever any where near there, make a bee-line for the garden and cafe, and make sure you order a slice of cactus cake with your coffee!

Weekly Photography Challenge: Prolific

I’m visiting my daughter and her little family this week (which is why I’m running late on this challenge!), and I thought of sharing some of Juniper’s prolific artwork, or toys, but I’ve been too busy playing (or resting up after playing).

Canberra is blessed with a proliferation of walking tracks and community sports grounds. One morning we loaded up the pram with a picnic and went to a grassy oval to enjoy the autumn sunshine (also prolific, much as we would like to see some rain). Juni was all set to walk the whole perimeter, but a reminder that Mummy had packed biscuits changed her mind! She raced me back, and I didn’t have a hope of catching up.

Weekly Photography Challenge: Sunset

Sun up, or sun down, that is the challenge…I’m not a morning person, I prefer to avoid dawn, except in winter when the sun also gets up later…

So here are some late-in-the-day spectacular skies. The street scene is in Horsham – not a colourful event, but I liked the quality of the light. The three on the right are all of the same evening, an apocalyptic looking cloud-scape over Ararat. We came out from a movie at the Astor Cinema, to find the light weirdly yellow, as it sometimes is with a storm brewing .The last is taken from the car on the way home – sunset over the Grampians, not that you can tell! It reminds me of a Tim Storrier painting, though.

Weekly Photography Challenge: Faces in a Crowd

Sometimes including faces in the crowd, or the backs of heads, adds an interesting layer to an image, without detracting from whatever they are looking at, or doing.

Our Hall Committee have hosted two High Teas (so far!). They are a lot of work, as well as a lot of fun, and I’ve been trying to remember to document them as much as possible. I pulled the phone out yesterday to catch Peter and Neil hard at work washing up and putting away the many bits and pieces that are essential for a proper High Tea. I had taken several photos of the room set up but empty of people – full, it looks quite different.

Granpa, Tilly and a small horse (and another young lass) needs no explanation.

The other three images are from our Trip of a Lifetime (2011 – time flies).

I took a lot of photos with Bryan in them – some deliberate, some because he was in the way… The little boys were “in my way” when I was taking photos of the rainbow in the International Fountain at the Seattle Center, but the shot with them there is by far the best of the lot. The last one is from the ferry, crossing from Port Angeles to Victoria BC – our three day foray to Canadian soil – looking back across the backs of other passengers at lovely Hurricane Ridge.