Weekly Photography Challenge: Out of this World

So, share an other-worldly image, although literally Out-of-this-World is difficult to manage (moon or stars would work, but decent images of celestial bodies require gear and, I suspect, patience, that I don’t have).

The horrid face is a paper mache creation that was consigned to the flames at bottom left. I sifted through the ashes afterwards and only managed to find one of the glass marble eyeballs. I gave up on trying to identify the teeth, since they were small quartz stones that are all over the ground here.

The bottom right image is a detail of naturally dyed fabric. I used metal paper clips as resist – the metal makes the black mark – they look like alien butterflies.

Weekly Photography Challenge: Faces in a Crowd

Sometimes including faces in the crowd, or the backs of heads, adds an interesting layer to an image, without detracting from whatever they are looking at, or doing.

Our Hall Committee have hosted two High Teas (so far!). They are a lot of work, as well as a lot of fun, and I’ve been trying to remember to document them as much as possible. I pulled the phone out yesterday to catch Peter and Neil hard at work washing up and putting away the many bits and pieces that are essential for a proper High Tea. I had taken several photos of the room set up but empty of people – full, it looks quite different.

Granpa, Tilly and a small horse (and another young lass) needs no explanation.

The other three images are from our Trip of a Lifetime (2011 – time flies).

I took a lot of photos with Bryan in them – some deliberate, some because he was in the way… The little boys were “in my way” when I was taking photos of the rainbow in the International Fountain at the Seattle Center, but the shot with them there is by far the best of the lot. The last one is from the ferry, crossing from Port Angeles to Victoria BC – our three day foray to Canadian soil – looking back across the backs of other passengers at lovely Hurricane Ridge.

Weekly Photography Challenge: Beloved

I love a lot of people and things, so choosing a particular beloved as my subject is a challenge indeed…

However, I saw my beloved Foo Fighters last week, supported by Weezer (love them too!), so here are some pictures from the show at Etihad Stadium in Melbourne. Every time I’ve seen them, I’ve been further away, I think! The first time I saw them play mid afternoon at the Big Day Out – I forget what year it was – and not all that many people cared. Now they can fill a stadium, and our seats were way up near the roof…Once the lights were out and the music began, I forgot about our vertiginous perch, and just enjoyed the show.

 

As the sun went down, golden rays lit up the windows on the far side of the auditorium, making for a light show that rivalled that on stage. Later on, Dave Grohl asked for darkness and then for the crowd to turn on their phones for a magical display of unity.

There’s nothing like a bit of community singing to cheer the heart, and there was plenty of that before the show was over and we all filed back outside. What’s not to love?

Weekly Photography Challenge:Variations

This week we are challenged to show variations on a theme , patterns, repetitions… I have a collection of old cutlery, and I do  get it out to use sometimes. I love the patina of the well used silver (well, EPNS…), and I prefer the old bone-handled knives with their Sheffield steel blades to modern ones.

I have been picking up washers where ever I see them for years. Although they are basically the same, they’re all different. Smaller ones get incorporated in junk jewellery, large ones in mixed-media art work.

Weekly Photography Challenge: Cheeky

I don’t know what happened, but I’ve missed a couple of weeks…Cheeky is a word often used of toddlers generally, and for our grand daughter Matilda in particular. They are endlessly curious and keen to try things we’d rather they didn’t – like pushing the button on the side of a brick public barbecue…She was so delighted by the cloud of smelly smoke that resulted – us not so much! And those things, so easy to turn on that a toddler can do it, have no off switch…

We went to the coast – Port Fairy and Killarney Beach, then the park at Koroit for hot chips and potato cakes (no BBQ) – because a hot day was forecast, and generally, the coast is cooler…But not always, and we chose one of the Hot On The Coast days, alas.

Weekly Photography Challenge:Glow

Things that glow are enticing subjects for photographers – it’s a challenge to capture the effect of light, and of course we want to preserve it for posterity, or at least be able to say “Look at that!”.

Early morning and late afternoon are best for that certain slant of light, but artificial light can be rewarding too, as in the two pics here of glass vessels back-lit and seen through frosted glass.

With the red Sparaxis – an old variety given to my mother  at least 50 years ago – the glow is all about the colour and texture in the petals, whereas the Mt Hood daffodil glows because the sun is shining through it’s crystalline whiteness.

The spectrum from a crystal in a window is glowing more than usual, because the textile is quite bright to start with. Look at that!

Weekly photography Challenge: Scale

I’ve taken photos from aeroplane windows, but I went for a smaller Scale for this week’s challenge. I’ve always liked miniatures, so tiny trees are bound to appeal to me, along with fairies and other little creatures – including a very small dinosaur among the succulents. The fairy door has a solar panel, so that I can look out the kitchen window at night and see the neighbouring fairies have their light on. The proto-bonsai is a Juniper, which I had to have since that’s my grand daughter’s name. I now need plants called Matilda and Banjo…

I didn’t notice the insect on the blueberry bush until after I took the photo – just lucky there! The tiny Wiry Bluebell is a native plant that just appeared in our garden one year and now thrives uninvited (but welcome)in at least half of my pots. The poppy leaves give scale, so you can tell how tiny the flower is.